I followed the American Heart Association’s recommendation for added sugar intake and here’s what I observed…

 

First of all, a little background… I’m a Registered Dietitian and a lifelong subscriber to healthy eating and daily exercise. I’m in my early 40’s, and other than some aches and pains from old injuries, I’m free of chronic issues. That being said, I’m always looking for ways to reduce burdens on my body and up my wellness game. I have a strong family history of Alzheimer’s/dementia so I’m generally on board with anything I can do to mitigate inflammation. 

 

I read a recent study that showed that nearly 90% of the American population is insulin resistant*. And knowing that insulin resistance is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer’s, I wondered, “how much added sugar am I eating in a day”? The American Heart Association recommends keeping added sugar to less that 24g per day. Surely, as healthy as my diet is, I must be under that… Right???

 

It turns out, I was not! While I wasn’t very far over, I was still over. So as a proponent of “practice what you preach”, and knowing that this is just one more step I can take to keep my brain healthy, I decided to make an immediate change and journal my results. For the next 7 days I’ll keep a food and added sugar journal and make note of any changes I feel. 

 

I encourage you to follow along with my journey and reach out with any questions or comments. 

 

Day 1 – 

½ cup silk plain almond milk yogurt – 4g added sugar

2 cups berries

Walnuts, pumpkin seeds

16oz decaf, low acid coffee – 2T Coconut cream no sugar

 

1 serving DJ&A shitake mushroom crisps – 2g added sugar

Carrots

Hummus

1 orange

 

½ Sweet Earth vegan pizza – 2g

Salad

Olive oil, Balsamic vinegar

1 oatmeal stout

 

Total water – 80oz       

 

End of day 1 and I feel great, though I wouldn’t say I feel any different than I usually do. I’m excited to see if I notice any changes throughout the process! 

 

Beth Jauquet, RD

 

*https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-healthy-journey/202206/why-your-depression-may-really-be-insulin-resistance